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2018 AGU Sessions of Interests

email us to add sessions to this list: events@geodynamics.org


 

DI23A: Advances in Computational Geosciences I

This session highlights advances in the theory and practice of computational geoscience, from improvements in numerical methods to their application to outstanding problems in the Earth sciences. Common issues include robust and efficient solvers, multiscale discretizations, design of benchmark problems and standards for comparison. Increasing data and computational power necessitates open source scientific libraries and workflow automation for model setup, 3D feature connectivity, and data assimilation, and automation in uncertainty representation and propagation, optimal design of field studies, risk quantification, and testing the predictive power of numerical simulations. By bringing these crosscutting computational activities together in one session, we hope to sharpen our collective understanding of fundamental challenges, level of rigor, and opportunities for reusable implementations. Contributions from all areas are welcome, including, but not limited to, fault modeling, tectonics, subduction, seismology, magma dynamics, mantle convection, the core, as well as surface processes, hydrology, and cryosphere.

DI24B: Advances in Computational Geosciences II eLightning

This session highlights advances in the theory and practice of computational geoscience, from improvements in numerical methods to their application to outstanding problems in the Earth sciences. Common issues include robust and efficient solvers, multiscale discretizations, design of benchmark problems and standards for comparison. Increasing data and computational power necessitates open source scientific libraries and workflow automation for model setup, 3D feature connectivity, and data assimilation, and automation in uncertainty representation and propagation, optimal design of field studies, risk quantification, and testing the predictive power of numerical simulations. By bringing these crosscutting computational activities together in one session, we hope to sharpen our collective understanding of fundamental challenges, level of rigor, and opportunities for reusable implementations. Contributions from all areas are welcome, including, but not limited to, fault modeling, tectonics, subduction, seismology, magma dynamics, mantle convection, the core, as well as surface processes, hydrology, and cryosphere.

TH25E: Community Forum: The Role of an Open-Source Software Initiative Within AGU

Software is now an essential part of almost any scientific research conducted. The spectrum of software used by scientists on a daily basis ranges from “mundane” data parsers, to numerical simulations, which solve a partial differential equation, to highly domain-specific tools for data analysis. The growth of the open-source software ecosystem has increased the availability of tools. Importantly, as more researchers open-source their software, there is less duplication of efforts in the development of routine tasks, strides are being made to improve reproducibility of results, and the ability of other researchers to build upon and extend work is greatly accelerated. As such, we see that open-source software is critical to the future of research in the geosciences. Therefore, we propose to start an Open-Source Software Initiative (OSSI) within the AGU. In this community forum, we would like to present our vision for the role of the OSSI and solicit feedback and ideas from the wider community.

DI31B: Advances in Computational Geosciences III Posters

This session highlights advances in the theory and practice of computational geoscience, from improvements in numerical methods to their application to outstanding problems in the Earth sciences. Common issues include robust and efficient solvers, multiscale discretizations, design of benchmark problems and standards for comparison. Increasing data and computational power necessitates open source scientific libraries and workflow automation for model setup, 3D feature connectivity, and data assimilation, and automation in uncertainty representation and propagation, optimal design of field studies, risk quantification, and testing the predictive power of numerical simulations. By bringing these crosscutting computational activities together in one session, we hope to sharpen our collective understanding of fundamental challenges, level of rigor, and opportunities for reusable implementations. Contributions from all areas are welcome, including, but not limited to, fault modeling, tectonics, subduction, seismology, magma dynamics, mantle convection, the core, as well as surface processes, hydrology, and cryosphere.

 

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